Natural health, beauty and fashion

How I Kept my New Succulent Alive

Your guide to keeping a plant alive for more than a minute

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If you’re anything like me, there’s probably a dried up plant somewhere in your house that you promised you’d remember to water a million times, but never got around to it. Either that, or you’ve simply given up on keeping anything alive anymore. If this sounds familiar, fear not – I’ve changed my ways, and you can too! Here’s my step by step guide how I’ve been keeping my succulent alive.

 

Wilting succulent

Step 1: Give a damn

In order to proceed with the steps you’ll need to take to keep your new plant baby alive, you’ll need to actually care whether it lives or dies. One easy way to do that is to name it. I named mine Stacy because, well, I’m her mom and I’ve “got it going on.” Plus, Stacy the succulent kind of works. It’s also a good idea to start off with something that’s pretty difficult to kill, because you don’t want to put yourself off by failing at the first hurdle.

Putting the succulent into a pot

Step 2: Assess the damage

When I took a proper look at Stacy, I could see she wasn’t feeling so hot. She was doing well enough to sprout a potential flower (maybe she was just so excited to be in a new home), but she looked a bit droopy and was seriously dry. No need to plan a funeral just yet though, because I figured out a few things she needed to get her way to a swift recovery.

 

Step 3: No soggy bottoms

Something I found out pretty early on after acquiring little Stacy was that she hates being sat in water for too long. It makes sense, because succulents retain their water really well so its actually bad to leave them stewing in moisture for long periods of time. You do still need to water them though (which I’ll come back to in a moment), but there are precautions you can take before getting to that step, to make sure you’ve got yourself a happy plant.

The first thing you need to do is go outside and find some pebbles or stones to put underneath the succulent inside the pot. This will let the water drain out the bottom of the succulent’s plastic pot and into the rocks, and your plant baby won’t be sitting in water anymore!

Be extra careful when tipping the plant out of its decorative pot, because I got soil all over my living room.

Step 4: Water (a lot, but not very often)

Succulents love it when they’re absolutely drenched every once in a while, rather than given small amounts of water often. I gave Stacy a generous amount of water until it started to pour from the holes in the bottom of her tub, but I’ll wait until the soil is bone dry before I water her again. Succulents also need to be watered more often around the early spring time, so I need to make sure I keep a close eye on her this month to make sure she doesn’t dry out on me!

 

Step 5: Support (her dreams)

After elevating and watering Stacy, the last thing I needed to do was help her grow big and strong (and in the right direction). The flower was beginning to grow nicely but wasn’t strong enough to support itself to grow upwards. I found an old chopstick in my drawer and used that as a support.

I was especially careful not to pierce any of the leaves, and it actually worked a treat! The stem wrapped around nicely and has been growing more rapidly ever since. The only problem is, I have absolutely no idea what to do if it starts to grow much longer – I’m going to need a bigger chopstick!

Keep in mind that I’m no plant expert. I’m just a rookie, trying to keep Stacy alive. If you want to read more about how to care for your plants – this time written by actual experts – try reading this.

Stacy is now happily sat on my living room table, getting lots of light and regular compliments.

… I’m not a regular mom, I’m a cool mom.

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